Coffee 123Some believe it is healthy and energizing, while others claim it is addictive and harmful. When you look at the evidence, the majority of studies on coffee and health actually show that it is good for you. For example, coffee has been linked to a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, liver diseases, Alzheimer’s and more.

The reason for this may be the impressive amount of powerful antioxidants found in coffee. In fact, studies show that coffee provides more antioxidants in the diet than any food group.

Coffee is Loaded with Several Powerful Antioxidants

Our bodies are under constant attack by reactive molecules called “free radicals.” These molecules have unpaired electrons that can damage important cell structures like proteins and DNA. This is where antioxidants step in. They donate electrons to the free radicals, effectively disarming them. This is believed to be protective against aging and many diseases that are partly caused by oxidative stress, including cancer.

Additionally, antioxidants can have various other biological effects and are considered to be very important for overall health. Interestingly, coffee contains very large amounts of several powerful antioxidants. These include hydrocinnamic acids and polyphenols, to name a few.

Hydrocinnamic acids are very effective at neutralizing free radicals and preventing oxidative stress. Additionally, the polyphenols found in coffee may help prevent a number of diseases, such as heart disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes.

Bottom line: Coffee contains very large amounts of antioxidants, including polyphenols and hydrocinnamic acids. These antioxidants may improve health and help reduce the risk of several diseases.

Dietary Sources of Antioxidants

Most people consume about 1–2 grams of antioxidants per day. The majority comes from beverages like coffee and tea. Beverages are actually a much larger source of antioxidants in the Western diet than food. In fact, 79 percent of dietary antioxidants come from beverages, while only 21 percent come from food.

Bottom line: Most antioxidants in the Western diet come from beverages such as coffee and tea. Only 21 percent of dietary antioxidants come from food.

Source:  www.ecowatch.com